The Fame and Recognition Shooter

I want to start out by first apologizing for not posting last week, and for posting late this week. Between work commitments and summer work around my home, I just ran out of time. When this happens, I am not keeping new and relevant information flowing to you, my readers. For this I apologize.

Last week I described the five types of shooters that I have identified in my research. They are:

  • Terrorist shooter
  • PTSD Shooter
  • Domestic spillover shooter
  • Mental health shooter
  • Fame and recognition shooter

We have already discussed the attributes of the Domestic Spillover Shooter, so this week I will discuss the Fame and Recognition Shooter. The Fame and Recognition Shooter has motives of being recognized and becoming infamous. In most instances they want to be covered by the news, and they are often inspired by previous news reports about mass shooters.

The noted forensic psychologist James L. Knoll calls these mass killers pseudocommando’s.

The term “pseudocommando” was first used to describe the type of mass murderer who plans his actions “after long deliberation,” and who kills indiscriminately in public during the daytime. He comes prepared with a powerful arsenal of weapons and has no escape planned. He is sometimes described as having the intent to die in a “blaze of glory.” Since glory has been defined as “a state of great gratification or exaltation,” the clich to go out in a blaze of glory would seem to be a perverse turn of phrase, considering the unfathomable pain and tragedy these individuals cause. This article briefly explores what is known about the mindset of the pseudocommando mass murderer and how he transforms his desire for revenge into a perverse sense of honor, which allows him to justify his actions (Knoll, 2012, p. 1).

He goes on to explain:

The research on pseudocommandos suggests that they are driven by strong feelings of anger and resentment, in addition to having paranoid character traits. Dietz described these individuals as “collectors of injustice” who hold onto every perceived insult, amassing a pile of “evidence” that they have been grossly mistreated. To sustain the revenge “romance,” they must corral the unwanted, hated, or feared aspects of themselves. This collection is then re-assembled into the form of an “enemy” who “deserves” to be the target of a merciless, incendiary rage. Thus, the pseudocommando maintains object relations with others, which are heavily based on envy and splitting.

Mullen described the results of his detailed forensic evaluations of 5 pseudocommando mass murderers who were caught before they could kill themselves or be killed. Mullen noted that the massacres were often well planned out (ie, the offender did not suddenly “snap”): the offender arrived at the crime scene well-armed, often in camo or “warrior” gear. He appeared to be pursuing a highly personal agenda of “payback.” Mullen’s study also found a number of traits and historical factors that these individuals had in common: They were bullied or isolated as children and had become “loners” who felt despair over being socially excluded. They were also described as being resentful grudge holders who demonstrated obsessional or rigid traits…

… Narcissistic, grandiose traits were present, along with heavy use of externalization. They held a generally disparaging view of others, which resulted in spending a great deal of time ruminating on past humiliations. The ruminations evolved into fantasies of violent revenge, to the point that the offenders seemed to “welcome death,” even perceiving it as bringing them “fame” with an aura of power. Most of the literature references the pseudocommando’s motivation of revenge, which may be directed at a group (pseudocommunity) or representative ideology. (Knoll, 2012, p. 2)

Knoll (2012) has done a large amount of forensic research on past mass killers, and in my opinion, he hit the nail on the head! While he calls them pseudocommando’s and I call the Fame and Recognition, what he describes accurately identifies the same type of shooter, and the same motives that I have found.

The weapons usually used by Fame and Recognition Shooters is typically a firearm. They will usually bring a more than one gun, and an exorbitant amount of ammunition. Occasionally they will bring improvised explosive devices to cause more death, damage, and destruction. On the rare occasion, they will also bring knives, however it should be noted that this is a very rare occurrence.

The Fame and Recognition Shooter will have committed hundreds of hours of research about killing. They will research every detail, thought out every step of the plan, and they will usually have a manifesto. This manifesto will probably detail why the feel wronged, who their intended targets are, and a highly detailed blueprint about how they plan to carry out their heinous crime. They also do not usually plan an escape because they plan to die in a blaze of glory.

The age of the Fame and Recognition Shooter can be anywhere from 12 years old to 90 years old. It is important to note that the vast majority of them are 30 years old and under. Just because the majority of these individuals are under the age of 30 does not mean it that you should remember that they can be any age. If you suspect that someone is going down the Fame and Recognition Shooter path, do not hesitate to contact the FBI or law enforcement.

Next week, we will continue down the path of identifying the specific types of shooters and the common attributes they display. Until then, be safe and be vigilant!, … Mark

Santa Fe and Domestic Violence Shooters

As I sat down to write this week’s blog, I reflected on the school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas last week. I am asking all of my readers to remember to pray for everyone involved in that incident. From the students and teachers that were attacked, the family members of those attacked, the police, firefighters, and EMS personnel, and yes, the shooter too. We also need to pray that potential future events might stopped before they occur so that there is not another senseless loss of life. Details are still coming in, and the underlying factors to this horrible event are still emerging. No matter what the underlying factors are, I believe that we all can agree that this was a horrible and irrational shooting incident.

Part of preventing an incident is knowing the signs before an incident occurs. By knowing the underlying motivations and the warning signs, we are better prepared to stop it before it occurs. My research has identified five different types of mass shooters. They are:

  • Terrorist shooter
  • PTSD Shooter
  • Domestic spillover shooter
  • Mental health shooter
  • Fame and recognition shooter

While I could go in the order they are posted, I feel it would be better to start with the most prevalent. That means I will start with the Domestic Spillover Shooter. Anyone that has ever had their heart broken by a domestic partner will know that domestic issues can be devastating. Relationship problems can cause grief, anger, disappointment, shock, denial, fear, and many other feelings. To list all of the feelings that an individual could go through would be nearly impossible, but these emotions are real to the person who is suffering from a break-up. Sometimes these emotions overcome individuals to the point that they do irrational things. Whether a lapse in judgement, an uncontrolled temper, or a mental health issue, the actions that some take are frightening, and can even deadly. Watching and knowing key signs may assist the church in pre-identifying those that may act out.

It is important to note that according to statistics by the National Domestic Violence Hotline (n.d.), 24% of women and 14% of men (over the age 18) in the United States will suffer severe physical violence in their lifetime. Domestic violence affects over 12 million people per year. More frightening is that 48% of all women and men have suffered psychological abuse from their domestic partner. Additionally, 16% of women and 5% of men will be the victim of stalking in their lifetime (National Domestic Violence Hotline, n.d.).

One method of identifying whether past or current domestic abuse occurred, is to look for specific warning signs in the person who you suspect is being abused. Those signs can include physical signs of injury (such as bruising and welts), low self-esteem, anxiety, and depression. You may also notice that they tend to stay isolated from family, friends, and their church family. If their abuser is present, they will tend to stay close by, so not to anger them. They may not take pride in themselves or their children, including their (or their children) physical appearance being unkempt. You may even suspect drug or alcohol abuse.

If you are looking for signs in the potential abuser, those signs can be controlling or unpredictable behavior, extreme jealousy, unrealistic expectations, or they may be verbally abusive to the victim or their children. This abuser will usually isolate their victims from others and/or make sure they are present any time the victims is near someone else. They may suffer sudden mood swings, and they may be cruel to children and/or animals. Many times, they will threaten violence to solve any problems they have, or they may blame others for their problems. In some instances, you may feel that they are a ticking time bomb, ready to go off.

When there is a break-up, or sometimes even a proposed break-up, the domestic aggressor may act out. Their targets might be those they believe led to the break-up, the victim, or the victims’ children, family, and/or friends may be their target. They may act out of anger, impulse, revenge, or from a mental breakdown. Sometimes, these individuals have the mentality “If I can’t have them, then nobody will have them”. Other times, they blame others for splitting the couple up or their domestic problems. If they mentally work themselves up, they might act out and become a mass shooter.

The common weapons used by these individuals are guns and knives. In most instances, they want to see the damage being done. This is why they will usually inflict the damage themselves. While the aggressor can be male or female, men are typically the perpetrator of mass shootings, while women typically harm or kill the individual they have an issue with. This is not to say that a woman could not, or would not, perpetrate a mass shooting, but statistically speaking they are less likely than men to commit a mass shooting.

If you see the signs of domestic abuse, or you have been told by an individual that they are being abused, you should immediately involve law enforcement. A mass shooting could occur even if they are not splitting up! The aggressor may be upset because the abused person is attending church, or even talking to someone about the couple’s problems. If you are aware of or suspect abuse and there is a split-up, then the church should be hypervigilant in watching for the abuser. It does not even matter if the abused is in hiding, the abuser may associate, even if untrue, that the church or someone in the church is responsible for the break-up.

Next week, I will discuss the Mental Health Shooter, and things to watch for with them. Until next week, be vigilant and maintain a strong situational awareness, … Mark

 

References

National Domestic Violence Hotline (n.d.). Get the facts & figures. Retrieved on May 23, 2018 from: http://www.thehotline.org/resources/statistics/

Please read this blog from beginning to end today because there is some very important information. There will be three things covered: a school shooting that was averted, my research on frequency of mass shootings, and the five types of mass shooters. The types of mass shooters will become five separate weeks of helping you to identify those that may be a threat to your church.

I am sure that most of you have heard by now that a school shooting was stopped before anyone was killed. Yesterday (5/16/2018), in the Dixon, IL, High School, shots rang out in a hallway near the gymnasium. Fortunately, nobody was shot except for the victim. Thanks to a quick acting School Resource Officer (SRO) who was near the gym at that time, this incident did not turn out tragically. Upon hearing the shots, the SRO rushed towards the shooter. According to reports, when the suspect saw the officer running towards him, he began to run away from the SRO. While running away, he turned and fired several shots at the officer. The officer returned fire and shot the suspect in the shoulder. Whether the intention was to shoot the suspect in the shoulder was on purpose or not is unknown, however it should be noted that no lives were lost at all. We thank God for this outcome, and please pray for this officer. Any time an officer has to shoot someone, it can be emotionally traumatic. He needs our prayers and God’s peace.

I also wanted to point out that I was off by a few days in predicting this shooting. The data showed that it should have happened late last week or early this week. I will be investigating why the data was off by these two days, as this may be important. Also, just for informational purposes, I will be investigating whether summer vacations at schools change the frequency of mass shootings. This research is all part of understanding the big picture when it comes to mass shootings.

Starting next week, I will be releasing some of my recent research on mass shooters through this blog. Some may wonder what this has to do with keeping churches safe, and I have an answer. By understanding who mass shooters are, and what their motivations are, we can begin to get a better insight into how to prevent mass shootings. My research has revealed five (5) distinct types of mass shooters. They are:

  • Terrorist shooters
  • PTSD shooters
  • Domestic spillover shooters
  • Mental health shooters
  • Fame and recognition shooters

Knowing what the motivation or underlying causes can help the church (and other organizations) understand what to look for. We can gain insight that someone may become a mass shooter based on specific characteristics of the suspect, or the difficulties they are facing in their life. While these are the five main categories, there can be overlap between two or more. The Venn Diagram below will help to understand the crossover.

Stay tuned to this blog for the next five weeks so that you can learn more. Until next week, stay safe and alert, … Mark

Public Safety Graduates and (separately) mass shootings in 2017

As many of you know, I teach at the graduate level for Tennessee Tech University. Last weekend, we had several students graduate with a Master of Science in Public Safety. Any time this happens, I have hope for the future. I have hope that the young students will be able to identify gaps in public safety, and because they have never been or only recently started working in the field, they will think of ways to protect the public that us old crusty’s don’t think of (because of the constraints we often see). I also am hopeful that the adult graduates who have been in the field will take the information they learned from us, and think of innovative ways to find, and mitigate, the issues that we see in public safety. These people are the future of public safety. While myself or someone else may come up with a few pieces of the puzzle, these graduates may be able to finish the puzzle on a specific issue. Seeing how bright these students are, gives me more hope for the safety of our children and grandchildren!

If you have read my blog before, you know I am a data guy. I usually dislike collecting data, but I love to look at data for insight and anomalies. While many people look at the big picture, I prefer to look at the little pieces that make up a more complete picture. I have learned that the little pieces can reveal things that we were not aware of, or that has slipped under the radar because it seemed insignificant.

Recently, the FBI came out with a not-so-surprising report on the number of mass shootings that occurred in 2016-2017, and for the most part, it is portion of the larger narrative on mass shootings. If we look over the statistics from 2016 and 2017, then compare them to the statistics of previous years, we can see a stark increase in mass shootings which are up 34%. For those of us that are daily working on this problem, or even the common person monitoring the mass shooting problem, it should be no major surprise!

The FBI began collecting data on mass shooters in 2000 and has kept track of data since. Some key takeaways from the most recent 2017 report are:

  • 50 mass shooting incidents occurred in 50 different states
  • 221 people were killed by mass shooters in 2017
  • 722 people were injured by mass shooters
  • 13 law enforcement officers were killed by mass shooters in 2017
  • 20 law enforcement officers were injured
  • All 50 of the mass shooters in 2017 were male
  • 13 mass shooters committed suicide
  • 11 were killed by police
  • 8 shooters were stopped by citizens

Of course, there is a lot more data in this report, but I think you get the idea. 2017 is acknowledged as the deadliest year of mass shootings since data has been collected. In full disclosure, some of this death and injury toll can be attributed to two major mass shooting incidents; the Las Vegas Shooting and the Sutherland Springs church shooting.

While I could go on and on about the statistics, one key statistic sticks out: Citizen intervention. It appears that in 10 of the incidents, citizens determined that they were not going down without a fight. Of those 10 incidents, four individuals without a firearm confronted or persuaded the mass shooter to stop the killing. In four incidents, individuals with firearms engaged the shooter and stopped the shooter. In the two unsuccessful attempts, one citizen with a valid firearm permit attempted to engage the shooter and died, and one who engaged the shooter with a firearm caused the shooter to go to another location.

In closing, let me remind everyone that they should maintain situational awareness at all times. Seeing that little thing that is out of place, or not quite right might save your life or many others. It might also allow you to intervene and stop the shooter before they ever start, much like is shown in this video.

Be vigilant this week, because according to statistics, another mass shooting is about to occur. Until next week, be safe and aware, … Mark

Creating a culture

Let me start off by stating that according to the statistics, there should not be a mass shooting this week, but there is a strong possibility that one will occur next week or early in the following week. I literally hate predicting these shootings, but I feel it is more important to hate it and possibly save lives, than it is to ignore it and let people not be prepared. Now on to this weeks information!

I sometimes feel like some of my readers think that my blog is a broken record. I imagine some of them read “Blah, blah, blah, blah!”. To be honest, I do repeat many of the same themes over and over again, but I do this because so many people hear the information but it do  not out it into actions. Much like the broken record of the past, I am going to be discussing two themes that I have shared in previous blogs; “See something-Say something” and the detrimental effects that media can have on mass shootings. Instead of these being (only) my words , I am going to provide hyperlinks so that you can see with your own eyes what I am talking about.

In looking at the “See something-Say something” realm of mass shootings, many people fail to recognize the importance of saying something.  Too many times, something doesn’t seem quite right about someone, and nothing is said. Inaction in this area can lead to death and destruction! We need to make a concerted effort to report anything that does not seem kosher with the way someone is acting.

A good friend of mine, who is also a law enforcement officer in Tennessee, has a funny name for these individuals. He calls them “squirrels”. My friend Jeremy can spot a squirrel quicker than most, and he takes the appropriate actions. Even when he is acting as a law enforcement officer, he lets others in law enforcement know that he has a suspicion that one individual may become a mass shooter. This leads me to ask the question that if law enforcement shares this information when they know it, why shouldn’t we?

To show you how effective this can be, I would like to direct you to a story about two teens that stopped a school shooting.  As you might guess, I have multiple news feeds that keep me informed about mass shootings. Please read this story so you can see how the “See something-say something” campaign can prevent mass shootings.

The second issue I want to talk about is the “Contagion Effect for Mass Shooters”. I was working on a research project this past week, when I ran across a video. This video discusses the role that the media plays in mass shooters. The interview is with the researcher that undertook this research project. Please view this 24-minute long video, and become more educated on the Contagion Effect of Mass Shooters.

Until next week; humbly yours, … Mark

Interesting data on mass shooters

I wanted to let everyone know that I am still here, but I am extremely busy with multiple projects. Having said this, I thought I would share the latest data on mass shooters.

As is usual, the Secret Service released data on mass shooters in 2017. This is a real eye opener for some, and you can compare it to what I have been saying all along. There are warning signs, and they openly discuss them in this report.

I should mention that I am still waiting for the data and the report from the FBI on 2017 mass shooting as well. These two reports together paint a more complete picture. The more we know, the better prepared we can be!

Until the FBI report comes out, please feel free to read the Secret Service report (which is linked here). There is a lot of good information in this report. Until next time, … Mark

Be hyper-vigilant!

As much as it pains me to do this, I am asking all of the readers of hyper-vigilant. According to statistical data, there will be a mass shooting this week, or at the latest, the beginning of next week. While the statistics sometimes prove me wrong, they more often than not occur as predicted. Out of the last six mass shootings, the statistical information I collect has been correct five of the last six times. I pray that these statistics are wrong (as always), but seriously doubt they will be.

Make sure you are using your situational awareness skills to keep yourself and those around you safe. Be aware of every aspect of the environment around you. If you see something, say something. If something does not seem right, get out of the situation before a situation turns bad. It is far better to miss an event, than it is to be shot or witness others being shot.

Finally, DO NOT hesitate to contact law enforcement with any suspicions about anything. It is better to report something that amounts to nothing, than to feel responsible for not reporting a strange occurrence and something happens. Please join me in praying that the statistics are wrong this time!

I have been ill this past week and could not write a post due to being so ill. I feel better now, and should have another post later this week. Stay safe and hyper-vigilant, … Mark

The types of mass shooters

As I was writing classes for law enforcement this week, it dawned on me that some of the same factors that will guide law enforcement through an investigation might be helpful to the churches and the individuals who fill those churches. For that reason, I will share some of the basic research findings about mass shooters.

Many classify mass shooters as mentally ill, but this does an injustice to the mentally ill, and lead people to wrongly classify the motivations behind mass shootings. Through my research, I have identified five different types of mass shooters (which could also be a mass bomber in most instances). Some may wonder why we would classify mass shooters. The explanation is simple: The more unique factors that we can identify, the more we know what makes them tick. As we learn more about what makes them tick, the better we can prevent these mass killings. The classification of mass shooters are:

  • Terrorists Mass Shooter/Bomber
  • PTSD Mass Shooter
  • Domestic Spillover Mass Shooter
  • Mental Illness Mass Shooter
  • Fame and Recognition Mass Shooter

It should be noted that these classifications of mass shooters are the basic classification. It provides a guide of what warning signs and actions we need to be looking for: However, as can be seen from the Venn Diagram below, they may be part of two or more classifications.

As an example, a veteran returning from war may have PTSD, Mental health problems, and Domestic Spillover that have combined and drives them to become a mass shooter. From knowing this information, we can deduct that pressure is building, and if and when they explode, it will likely be a rage shooting, meaning they can’t take any more and they act out with little warning and little to no planning.

It is important to note that not all PTSD cases are military veterans. These individuals can have PTSD from  multiple different reasons including; sexual abuse, child abuse, public safety work, and more. In instances where multiple classifications interact, pretty much only those trained in classifying potential shooters will be able to differentiate the melding of more than one type of shooter classification.

Understanding the driving factors which identify the type of (potential) shooter someone might become can help to mitigate and stop the actual act of violence. By knowing what their motivations are, we can gain basic knowledge of how to approach them, what their motivators and triggers are, and the type of help they may need or the actions that can legally be taken to stop them in advance of an incident.

It is important to remember that untrained individuals should not approach them, but refer your suspicions to an expert who knows what typically works, up to and including taking them off of the streets. Should you think that you have identified a potential shooter, do not attempt to engage them! This action could have deadly consequences. Also, you should never (EVER) visit them at their home, even if invited. Many individuals have thought out what they would do if they had “their enemy” on their home turf.

Next week, I will begin describing each of these mass shooters/bombers classifications, and describe what their motivators often are, as well as their preferred weapons. Until then, … Mark

My rant!

I read Carl Chinn’s guest blog this week, and it was so obvious how prevalent violence in the church has become. If you haven’t read it, you might want to. The statistics are almost unbelievable. It just goes to show how far our society has declined, and the true hold that Satan has on much of our society! I will stop here, and leave it as the end of my first rant, even though I could write pages on it. Something tells me I would be preaching to the choir.

As is common, I also looked back over the news and information that I found or was sent this week. I couldn’t help but wonder if some people haven’t lost their ever-loving mind because of mass shooters, and the fears that they have about them. Some of this news just made me shake my head. I especially am shaking my head about putting a bucket of river rock in each classroom for students to throw at a mass shooter.

It seems that a school administrator in Pennsylvania has come up with a bucket of rocks in each classroom as a “last ditch” effort to defend themselves against a mass shooter in their school. Now don’t get me wrong, using anything against someone actively trying to kill you, or someone else, is better than laying down and dying. Of course we can also look at David and Goliath; it seems a rock did help David out.  I mean, we do teach the Run, Hide, Fight (fight as a last resort) and the ALICE training, but books would do the same thing as these rocks to distract and/or hurt a shooter, if needed. Still, is it really that smart to provide teenage boys and girls a bucket of rocks against someone wanting to kill them?

I don’t know about most of you, but when I was growing up, I thought I was invincible. As a six year old, I jumped through a  garage entry door (that had windows from top to bottom) while playing batman (I was not the brightest child).  That caused me to have numerous stitches, and from what I am told, it was touch and go for a while from all the blood loss. The worst part was I didn’t learn from that experience. When I was 11 or so, and my family was building a house, When we were sheathing and shingling it, I would regularly jump off the roof, a 10-12 foot drop. Why? Because it didn’t take as long as climbing down the ladder. I look back and think of the many times I pulled stupid moves similar to this, including working on my three wheeler and making it run almost 90 miles per hour at the ripe age of 15. I also think about others, people that have good common sense today, that used to build ramps and jump an ATV over power lines on their farms, and the kids I knew as teenagers that used to play with fire and gunpowder. If any of today’s teenagers have the same mentality I (and others) did when I was that age, then they have played it out in their mind how they would save the rest of the school from a shooter because of their pitching arm. Unfortunately, that will likely get several killed.  Perhaps it would be better for the school to have fundraisers and provide some better security measures. On the other hand, at least they aren’t ignoring the situation. Still, I believe that they are putting their students at more risk.

My final rant is based on the recent rash of explosives. A few months ago, I predicted that bombs would start to be an issue. I also predicted that they would eventually work their way into our houses of worship. We only need to look at the past two weeks to see how this is beginning to come to fruition. Over the last few weeks, we have seen a bomber in Austin, a man that sent explosives to 11 military bases, a teenager who brought a bomb to school, and various other incidents related to explosives. These types of incidents only leads me to believe that we will see more of these types of incidents, and they will begin to filter into our churches. Please be vigilant, and look for anything suspicious in our houses of worship, whether a person or a package. The devil and his minions are unfortunately alive and well. Let’s try to thwart their success. Until next time, … Mark

Planning and mitigation works!!!!

As is becoming commonplace, I am a day late with my blog submission. I know that this blog keeps many of you informed. I apologize for being late (again)! Unless you do not watch the news, you know that my prediction last week of another mass shooting, almost rang true . I say almost rang true because the school, and those involved with protecting children in that community, had a plan. As soon as news broke, multiple people began to text me and call me about the incident. One of my university students (who has been amazed at my predictions) even asked if I was a prophet. While I would be honored to take that title, I can only say that I foresee when mass shootings will happen through following the statistics.

As I said in the last paragraph, the school and public safety community had a plan. Not only did they have a plan, but they had the resources in place to deal with such a situation. It is unfortunate that the shooter died, but that was part of that shooters own choice. They had a choice about bringing the gun to school, they had a choice regarding whether to shoot or not, and they had a choice on shooting at the School Resource Officer. The shooter had choices, but those he shot, and shot at, did not! The shooter in exercising his choices, did not allow his victims to have any choices.

Fortunately, the schools and public safety made choices long before the incident ever happened. The primary choice was whether to plan and implement mitigation measures, which they did. This community thwarted not only this attempt, but also the one before it at Leonardtown High School . By planning, only the Lord knows how many lives have been saved in just this one community.

The point I want to make from this: Churches also need to make plans and undertake serious mitigation measures. Some churches believe that a few firearms in the church (alone) are enough to protect a church. It is not, and this type of mentality may lead to a shootout similar to the one at OK Corral. In that type of scenario, you are creating an environment where innocent people may be shot, and possibly even killed. Serious plans need to be made to keep a shooter outside of the church. While there is no “one-size fits all” plan for churches, there are some basic concepts that need to be in place.

  1. Total situational awareness-take your head out of the sand and watch for something out of the ordinary, or dangerous, that might be evolving!
  2. Implement layered security-Identify multiple areas where a shooter can be denied entry and denied access to parishioners. Use those layers to make it harder and harder to get to their target(s) (such as a person monitoring the outside, greeters that know what to look for, ways of quickly securing doors, door film to stop entry, trained security teams, etc.).
  3. Train parishioners– Train everyone in the church on what they should do if a shooter gets past your defenses and the shooter overcomes all mitigation measures.

The end goal is not to kill someone with evil intentions; the end goal is to protect church goers. If it is possible for law enforcement (or even a security team) to take the individual(s) alive, that gives the church the opportunity to show this person God’s love, and to even lead them to the Lord later on. This could even be while they are in prison or even possibly a mental institution.

As I close, I look at the statistics again. The next shooting will be harder for me to predict. Why? Because a school district, local law enforcement, and a school resource officer did not ignore protecting their students. Additionally, the media has not provided nearly as much coverage about this incident or about how the shooter was stopped. Because of this, there is a good chance that the next mass shooting may be delayed. Then again, it may create a challenge to someone else who thinks the last shooter botched their own infamy. No matter what happens, I praise the Lord that no innocent students died in this latest attack and that more were not shot. I can only pray that more schools and churches learn from this latest shooting. Until next week, … Mark