Medical emergencies

Last week, I touched on the mitigation of medical emergencies. This is an important factor whether you someone is having a heart attack, or if an active shooter got past you defenses. Having a medical response team is an important part of being prepared, no matter what the emergency.

Nearly every church in the United States has some type of first responder that attends their church. I know in my small country church, with a weekly total of congregants of less than 60 per week, we have several first responders, or former first responders/medical staff. Even though two of them moved away (a CNA and a firefighter), we still have a former respiratory therapist (with ER experience), a nurse, and a former firefighter/EMT. We also have an EMT-I that occasionally attends. If needed, we also have multiple veterans from the Vietnam and Cold War era who have had some basic medical training. If you think about it, these veterans could be very helpful in the aftermath of an active shooter in church.

Every church should, at the very least, consider forming a medical response team. This team should be created not only to respond to active shooters, but nearly every type of emergencies. These are the members that will be able to stabilize someone that has fallen, to help someone that has suffered a stroke, and even do CPR, potentially saving their life.  They might be the one that might be able to save a child that was hit by a car, or the elderly person who has fallen down the stairs.

When looking for people within the congregation that might be suitable for an medical response team, there are a handful of individuals who would likely be willing to help in this capacity. They include:

  • Nurses
  • Medical doctors
  • EMT’s and Paramedics
  • DOT Medical first responder’s
  • Firefighter
  • Law enforcement officers
  • Former military medics
  • Anyone trained in medicine
  • People trained to American Red Cross first aid standards
  • People trained in CPR and AED’s
  • Trained veterans

There may also be others that are also trained in first aid who might be able to help in an emergency, such as Boys Scouts, Girl Scouts, work safety teams, and more. These people are already somewhat trained in what to do in a medical emergency. Because they already have the knowledge of what to do, why not utilize them to keep Gods flock healthy and safe.

Beyond responding to a medical emergency, this medical response team could also be used to  identify early medical problems. I know of several churches that use nurse volunteers to do blood pressure checks, and who give church goers advice on what to ask their doctor when they next visit them.

Tomorrow, I will discuss some basic tools and/or supplies that should be collected to help make the medical response team more effective. Until tomorrow, may God bless you, … Mark

Missed signs may have caused deaths

For a little over a week now, I have been telling you about signs that should send up red flags. Unfortunately, these signs were missed in the two most recent shootings, and missed horribly. Had something been done, such as a court ordered psych evaluation, there is a good possibility that many people would still be here on earth rather than souls in heaven.

I thought today would be a good day to give you some things to ponder. First, both the Texas shooter and the California shooter should not have been able to purchase firearms. To be honest, they probably would have found another way of causing death and destruction, but still, this needs to be pointed out. The warning signs that were there for these two shooter still should have been HUGE red flags to everyone around them and to law enforcement!

Let’s start with the Texas shooter. According to a story by Meghan Keneally and Luis Martinez of ABC News (2017), the shooter had multiple signs that he was a prime candidate to become an active shooter. The first outward sign happened when he chocked, kicked, and slapped his wife in 2011. Just three days later, he hit his 1-1/2 year old stepson in the head, fracturing his skull. In 2012 he escaped from a mental health facility and was trying to take a bus out of town. The report of his escape said that he was a danger to himself and others. He had already been caught sneaking firearms onto his Air Force Base, and he made death threats to his military chain of command. He was confined for 9-1/2 months of a 12 month sentence, released early for good behavior. In 2013, he was accused of sexual assault. In 2014, he was cited for cruelty to animals for closed fist punching a dog repeatedly.  Just 5 days before his rampage, he and his children attended the fall festival at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs. While this last information is not a warning sign, I can’t help but wonder if he was scoping out the church for what he would do five days later.

In the California shooting, similar signs were missed or ignored according to a story by the Associated Press (AP [2017]). He was out on $160,000 bail after an alleged assault, stabbing his neighbor with a knife. He was supposed to surrender all of his firearms in January.  Multiple neighbors complained that he was firing hundreds of rounds of ammunition over the last few weeks. In an interview

that reporter Jim Shultz , a court reporter for Shasta County reveals many signs I have warned about. Neighbors said they could hear the (eventual) shooter come unhinged on a regular basis. According to the AP story, both the mother and the sister of this man said he had “mental issues. The story went on to say that the shooter was marijuana grower, and he had a long-standing dispute with a neighbor he believed was making meth. According to the AP story, just prior to the incident, he called her and told her that the people in the town were trying to execute him (paranoia) . She admitted that she knew he was mentally unstable, and so did his sister.

When we look at these warning signs, we see that both of these shooters portrayed them. Do you have someone in your community portraying these signs? If so, you should not ignore them! I have taken the proactive stance of adding the full list of warning signs at the bottom of this post. Feel free to share them and print them for yourself. Hang them by your desk, or somewhere that will be seen by you on a regular basis. As always, I encourage to be proactive rather than reactive, … Mark

References

Associated Press (November 15, 2017). Warning Signs: California shooter Kevin Neal was out on bail, worried neighbors, fired hundreds of practice rounds. Retrieved from: http://torontosun.com/news/world/warning-signs-california-shooter-kevin-neal-was-out-on-bail-worried-neighbours-fired-hundreds-of-practice-rounds

Connor, T., & Arkin, D. (November 6, 2017). Texas Gunman Devin Kelley escaped from mental health facility in 2012. Retrieved from: https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/texas-church-shooting/texas-gunman-devin-kelley-escaped-mental-health-facility-2012-n818496

Schultz, J. (November 15, 2017). Rancho Tehama man talks about incident

. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/JimSchultz_RS/status/930500370073206784

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FEEL FREE TO PRINT, SHARE, AND/OR POST THIS QUICK GUIDE

Active Shooter Common Characteristics

According to the FBI, active shooters are typically male (94%), with the youngest recorded age being 13 years old and the oldest being 88 years old. The vast majority (87%) are under the age of 40. Common themes of past active shooters include:

  • May lack social skills
  • May have been a victim of teasing/bullying
  • May have conflicts with coworkers
  • May suffer from depression
  • May reveal aggressive or explosive behavior
  • May violate safety guidelines
  • May not accept responsibility
  • May be paranoid
  • May have an interest in guns/weapons
  • May not take criticism well
  • May blame others
  • Might threaten people
  • May suffer emotional outbursts

Signs that Should Indicate an Increased Awareness

Past active shooters had common attributes. For these attributes to be included in this list, it had to be present in at least 25% of the active shooters life history. While these signs may not indicate they will become an active shooter, they should cause individuals that may become victims to have a raised awareness. If two or more are present, you may want to notify the police.

  • Hostility or conflicts at work or home
  • Financial difficulties
  • Legal problems
  • Domestic problems
  • Currently using drugs or alcohol
  • Poor ob performance evaluation
  • History of violence against others
  • History of being abused or neglected
  • Disciplinary action or job termination
  • Involuntary job changes–different roles, responsibilities or work groups
  • May exhibit recent signs of mental illness with outbursts

Red Flags that MIGHT Require Intervention

Just prior to active shooting incidents, most perpetrators displayed common signs which may indicate the potential to act on an impulse to become an active shooter. Not everyone that displays one or more of these signs will definitely become and active shooter, but it should be a sign that intervention should at the very least be considered. For items in bold lettering, action should be taken immediately:

  •  Extremely high level of distress
  • Threats of homicide or suicide
  • Fantasies of homicide or suicide
  • Weapons: Use, threat of use, or recent impulse purchase 
  • Obsessiveness
  • Substance/Alcohol abuse
  •  Pet /Animal abuse